Peace The bibical meaning

by admin on September 16, 2017

It was​ meant​ to​ act​ as​ a​ blessing​ on​ the​ one​ to​ whom​ it​ was​ spoken: “May​ your​ life​ be​ filled​ with​ health,​ prosperity,​ and​ victory.”

Peace Peace​ ​[N]​ ​[T] The​ ​Meaning​ ​of​ ​Peace.​ ​In​ ​English,​ ​the​ ​word​ ​”peace”​ ​conjures​ ​up​ ​a​ ​passive picture,​ ​one​ ​showing​ ​an​ ​absence​ ​of​ ​civil​ ​disturbance​ ​or​ ​hostilities,​ ​or​ ​a personality​ ​free​ ​from​ ​internal​ ​and​ ​external​ ​strife.​ ​The​ ​biblical​ ​concept​ ​of peace​ ​is​ ​larger​ ​than​ ​that​ ​and​ ​rests​ ​heavily​ ​on​ ​the​ ​Hebrew​ ​root​ ​slm,​ ​which means​ ​”to​ ​be​ ​complete”​ ​or​ ​”to​ ​be​ ​sound.”​ ​The​ ​verb​ ​conveys​ ​both​ ​a​ ​dynamic and​ ​a​ ​static​ ​meaning”to​ ​be​ ​complete​ ​or​ ​whole”​ ​or​ ​”to​ ​live​ ​well.”​ ​The​ ​noun had​ ​many​ ​nuances,​ ​but​ ​can​ ​be​ ​grouped​ ​into​ ​four​ ​categories:​ ​(1)​ ​salom​ ​[l’v] as​ ​wholeness​ ​of​ ​life​ ​or​ ​body​ ​(i.e.,​ ​health);​ ​(2)​ ​salom​ ​[l’v]​ ​as​ ​right​ ​relationship or​ ​harmony​ ​between​ ​two​ ​parties​ ​or​ ​people,​ ​often​ ​established​ ​by​ ​a​ ​covenant (see​ ​”covenant​ ​of​ ​peace”​ ​in​ ​Num​ ​25:12-13​ ​;​ ​Isa​ ​54:10​ ​;​ ​Ezek​ ​34:25-26​ ​) and,​ ​when​ ​related​ ​to​ ​Yahweh,​ ​the​ ​covenant​ ​was​ ​renewed​ ​or​ ​maintained with​ ​a​ ​”peace​ ​offering”;​ ​(3)​ ​salom​ ​[l’v]​ ​as​ ​prosperity,​ ​success,​ ​or​ ​fulfillment (see​ ​Lev​ ​26:3-9​ ​);​ ​and​ ​(4)​ ​salom​ ​[l’v]​ ​as​ ​victory​ ​over​ ​one’s​ ​enemies​ ​or absence​ ​of​ ​war.​ ​​Salom [l’v] was​ used​ in​ both​ greetings​ and​ farewells.
​ It was​ meant​ to​ act​ as​ a​ blessing​ on​ the​ one​ to​ whom​ it​ was​ spoken: “May​ your​ life​ be​ filled​ with​ health,​ prosperity,​ and​ victory.”
​ ​ ​As​ ​an adjective,​ ​it​ ​expressed​ ​completeness​ ​and​ ​safety.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​New​ ​Testament, the​ ​Greek​ ​word​ ​eirene​ ​[eijrhvnh]​ ​is​ ​the​ ​word​ ​most​ ​often​ ​translated​ ​by​ ​the word​ ​”peace.”​ ​Although​ ​there​ ​is​ ​some​ ​overlap​ ​in​ ​their​ ​meanings,​ ​the Hebrew​ ​word​ ​salom​ ​[l’v]​ ​is​ ​broader​ ​in​ ​its​ ​usage,​ ​and,​ ​in​ ​fact,​ ​has​ ​greatly influenced​ ​the​ ​New​ ​Testament’s​ ​use​ ​of​ ​​eirene
​ ​ ​[eijrhvnh].
God​ ​as​ ​the​ ​Source​ ​of​ ​Peace.​ ​God​ ​alone​ ​is​ ​the​ ​source​ ​of​ ​peace,​ ​for​ ​he​ ​is “Yahweh​ ​Shalom”​ ​(see​ ​Judges​ ​6:24​ ​).​ ​The​ ​Lord​ ​came​ ​to​ ​sinful​ ​humankind, historically​ ​first​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Jews​ ​and​ ​then​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Gentiles,​ ​desiring​ ​to​ ​enter​ ​into​ ​a relationship​ ​with​ ​them.​ ​He​ ​established​ ​with​ ​them​ ​a​ ​covenant​ ​of​ ​peace, which​ ​was​ ​sealed​ ​with​ ​his​ ​presence​ ​(see​ ​Num​ ​6:24-26​ ​).​ ​Participants​ ​were given​ ​perfect​ ​peace​ ​(salom​ ​salom​ ​[l’vl’v])​ ​so​ ​long​ ​as​ ​they​ ​maintained​ ​a​ ​right relationship​ ​with​ ​the​ ​Lord​ ​(see​ ​Isa​ ​26:3;​ ​2​ ​Thess​ ​3:16).
The​ ​Old​ ​Testament​ ​anticipated,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​New​ ​Testament​ ​confirmed,​ ​that
God’s​ ​peace​ ​would​ ​be​ ​mediated​ ​through​ ​a​ ​messiah​ ​(see​ ​Isa​ ​9:6-7;​ ​Micah 5:4-5).​ ​Peace​ ​with​ ​God​ ​came​ ​through​ ​the​ ​death​ ​and​ ​resurrection​ ​of​ ​Jesus Christ​ ​(Rom​ ​5:1;​ ​Eph​ ​2:14-17;​ ​Col​ ​1:19-20;​ ​see​ ​Heb​ ​13:20).​ ​Peter​ ​declared to​ ​Cornelius:​ ​”You​ ​now​ ​the​ ​message​ ​God​ ​sent​ ​to​ ​the​ ​people​ ​of​ ​Israel, telling​ ​the​ ​good​ ​news​ ​of​ ​peace​ ​through​ ​Jesus​ ​Christ,​ ​who​ ​is​ ​Lord​ ​of​ ​all” (Acts​ ​10:36).
The​ ​Relationship​ ​of​ ​Righteousness​ ​to​ ​Peace.​ ​The​ ​Lord​ ​established​ ​a covenant,​ ​which​ ​resulted​ ​in​ ​the​ ​participants​ ​receiving​ ​his​ ​salom​ ​[l’v]​ ​in abundance,​ ​”like​ ​a​ ​river”​ ​(see​ ​Isa​ ​48:18).​ ​However,​ ​peace​ ​could​ ​be disturbed​ ​if​ ​one​ ​did​ ​not​ ​live​ ​before​ ​the​ ​Lord​ ​and​ ​others​ ​in​ ​righteousness;​ ​in fact,​ ​peace​ ​is​ ​one​ ​of​ ​the​ ​fruits​ ​of​ ​righteousness​ ​(Isa​ ​32:17-18).​ ​The​ ​psalmist poetically​ ​describes​ ​the​ ​relationship​ ​between​ ​the​ ​two​ ​as​ ​righteousness​ ​and peace​ ​kissing​ ​each​ ​other​ ​(Psalm​ ​85:10).​ ​The​ ​God​ ​of​ ​peace​ ​and​ ​the​ ​peace of​ ​God​ ​sanctify​ ​the​ ​child​ ​of​ ​God​ ​(see​ ​1​ ​Thess​ ​5:23).​ ​On​ ​the​ ​other​ ​hand, Scripture​ ​specifically​ ​states​ ​that​ ​there​ ​can​ ​be​ ​no​ ​peace​ ​for​ ​the​ ​wicked​ ​(Isa 48:22;​ ​57:21).​ ​Paul​ ​described​ ​the​ ​difference​ ​as​ ​follows:​ ​”There​ ​will​ ​be trouble​ ​and​ ​distress​ ​for​ ​every​ ​human​ ​being​ ​who​ ​does​ ​evil:​ ​first​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Jew, then​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Gentile;​ ​but​ ​glory,​ ​honor​ ​and​ ​peace​ ​for​ ​everyone​ ​who​ ​does good:​ ​first​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Jew,​ ​then​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Gentile”​ ​(Rom​ ​2:9-10).
One​ ​of​ ​the​ ​key​ ​issues​ ​among​ ​the​ ​prophets​ ​was​ ​the​ ​doctrine​ ​of​ ​”peace.” The​ ​false​ ​prophets​ ​proclaimed​ ​”peace,​ ​peace”​ ​and​ ​in​ ​that​ ​announcement hoped​ ​to​ ​create​ ​peace​ ​for​ ​their​ ​constituency.​ ​The​ ​true​ ​prophets​ ​argued​ ​that peace​ ​could​ ​never​ ​be​ ​achieved​ ​apart​ ​from​ ​righteousness​ ​and​ ​justice.​ ​In this​ ​light,​ ​one​ ​can​ ​better​ ​understand​ ​what​ ​Jesus​ ​meant​ ​when​ ​he​ ​declared, “Do​ ​not​ ​suppose​ ​that​ ​I​ ​have​ ​come​ ​to​ ​bring​ ​peace​ ​to​ ​the​ ​earth.​ ​I​ ​did​ ​not come​ ​to​ ​bring​ ​peace,​ ​but​ ​a​ ​sword”​ ​(Matt​ ​10:34).​ ​And​ ​Paul​ ​wrote,​ ​”The​ ​God of​ ​peace​ ​will​ ​soon​ ​crush​ ​Satan​ ​under​ ​your​ ​feet”​ ​(Rom​ ​16:20).​ ​Judgment​ ​on sin,​ ​historically​ ​and​ ​eschatologically,​ ​must​ ​come​ ​prior​ ​to​ ​peace.

Good governance, transparency, accountability, human Rights and the rule of law

Peace​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Age​ ​to​ ​Come.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​age​ ​to​ ​come​ ​the​ ​animal​ ​kingdom​ ​will​ ​be restored​ ​to​ ​its​ ​paradisiacal​ ​tranquility.​ ​The​ ​image​ ​in​ ​Isaiah​ ​11:6-11​ ​is
among​ ​the​ ​most​ ​picturesque​ ​in​ ​Scripture.​ ​Animals​ ​are​ ​paired​ ​off​ ​in​ ​a strange​ ​and​ ​wonderful​ ​way:​ ​the​ ​wolf​ ​and​ ​the​ ​lamb,​ ​the​ ​leopard​ ​with​ ​the​ ​kid, the​ ​calf​ ​with​ ​the​ ​lion,​ ​the​ ​cow​ ​with​ ​the​ ​bear,​ ​the​ ​lion​ ​with​ ​the​ ​ox.​ ​They​ ​shall be​ ​led​ ​by​ ​a​ ​little​ ​child.​ ​The​ ​emphasis​ ​is​ ​on​ ​the​ ​harmony,​ ​the​ ​salom​ ​[l’v] between​ ​the​ ​animals​ ​and​ ​the​ ​animal​ ​kingdom​ ​with​ ​man.​ ​Children​ ​shall,​ ​in that​ ​day,​ ​be​ ​able​ ​to​ ​play​ ​with​ ​snakes​ ​and​ ​they​ ​will​ ​not​ ​be​ ​hurt.
In​ ​addition,​ ​the​ ​curse​ ​of​ ​the​ ​ground​ ​will​ ​be​ ​removed​ ​and​ ​the​ ​land​ ​will​ ​again be​ ​characterized​ ​by​ ​salom​ ​[l’v],​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​both​ ​harmony​ ​and productivity​ ​(see​ ​Amos​ ​9:13-15).​ ​The​ ​desert​ ​will​ ​become​ ​a​ ​fertile​ ​field​ ​(Isa 32:15),​ ​while​ ​the​ ​cultivated​ ​lands​ ​will​ ​drip​ ​with​ ​”new​ ​wine”​ ​and​ ​the​ ​”ravines of​ ​Judah​ ​will​ ​run​ ​with​ ​water”​ ​(Joel​ ​3:18).
The​ ​nations​ ​of​ ​the​ ​world​ ​will​ ​come​ ​under​ ​the​ ​dominion​ ​of​ ​the​ ​”Prince​ ​of Peace”​ ​and​ ​in​ ​so​ ​doing,​ ​”will​ ​beat​ ​their​ ​swords​ ​into​ ​plowshares​ ​and​ ​their spears​ ​into​ ​pruning​ ​hooks”​ ​(Isa​ ​2:4;​ ​Micah​ ​4:3).​ ​Isaiah​ ​poetically characterizes​ ​it​ ​as​ ​a​ ​time​ ​when​ ​”You​ ​shall​ ​go​ ​out​ ​with​ ​joy​ ​and​ ​be​ ​led​ ​forth​ ​in peace;​ ​the​ ​mountains​ ​and​ ​hills​ ​will​ ​burst​ ​into​ ​song​ ​before​ ​you,​ ​and​ ​all​ ​the trees​ ​of​ ​the​ ​field​ ​will​ ​clap​ ​their​ ​hands”​ ​(Isa​ ​55:12).
One​ ​cannot​ ​overlook​ ​the​ ​fact​ ​that​ ​this​ ​harmony​ ​will​ ​never​ ​happen​ ​until​ ​man has​ ​a​ ​right​ ​relationship​ ​(salom​ ​[l’v])​ ​with​ ​Yahweh;​ ​it​ ​will​ ​be​ ​the​ ​result​ ​of​ ​the righteous​ ​rule​ ​of​ ​the​ ​”shoot​ ​from​ ​the​ ​stump​ ​of​ ​Jesse”​ ​who​ ​has​ ​upon​ ​him​ ​the Spirit​ ​of​ ​Yahweh;​ ​he​ ​is​ ​the​ ​”Prince​ ​of​ ​Peace”​ ​​(Isa​ ​9:6;​ ​see​ ​Jer​ ​33:8-9).

{ 0 comments }

The Context

Africa is growing and changing every day. Those who have spent any length of time in Africa have seen the population growth- mainly in the capital cities. This growing and changing environment is contrasted by the lack of growth and change in the social, political and economic sectors.  As the population is increasing in numbers all over Africa, some countries are facing serious problems in maintaining the growth and movement of their populations.  Others lack even a viable infrastructure to contain their populations within their borders and create more life opportunities.  As populations grow, so too grows a sense of dissatisfaction, humiliation and shame among many Africans- especially the young.

As in other places, the end of the Cold War (1989) has increased the number of challenges any government has to face. The nature and sources of conflict, for example, have dramatically changed and reveal a need for serious inquiry. The presence of new, often non-state actors (warlords), and the increasing numbers of cross-border wars are among many of the new phenomena Africa is facing (Rwanda, Burundi, DRC, Sudan, Tchad, DRC, Congo-Brazzaville, Uganda, Somali, Kenya).    Armed conflict and the number of internally and externally displaced people have also created a new phenomenon in conflict study in the continent.  Refugees populations are no longer composed solely of civilians only but now are often mingled with armed groups, the former army and even members of the overthrown government- as was seen in the aftermath of the ‘94 Rwandan Genocide.

Once in refugee camps or in exile, those groups (known as negative forces) can take advantage of the proximity of the refugee camps to their former countries, reorganizing themselves and launching attacks which create regional insecurity and destabilization as demonstrated in recent case of South Sudan- North of DR Congo (January2017).  Like during the apartheid regime in South Africa, the regime conducted incursion in neighboring countries such as Lesotho, Botswana and Swaziland to track down black south Africans refugees. The same happened when in 1996 regimes in the Great Lakes Region of Africa including Rwanda-Burundi-Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo fought each other or accused one another of harboring refugees, the same thing happened in West and Southern Africa including Liberia-Sierra Leone, Liberia-Sierra Leone- Guinea (Conakry), Namibia- Botswana, Zambia-Angola, Namibia-Angola, Sudan-Uganda etc…

Most of these inter-state conflicts began with the presence of people displaced from their homelands, who attempt to return by use of force as a rebel movement. In other cases, conflict erupts as former refugees return, demanding to regain their land and belongings.

FARDC Uvira

The other phenomenon observed is that of national identity- as is the case in Congo-DRC (the Banyamulenge issue), and in Cote d’Ivoire (with A. Ouattara). This phenomenon, identified as Identity Conflict, has its origins in the non-recognition of cultural differences among many. This inability and unwillingness to transcend cultural differences is generated by the myth of origins and the lack of structural land reform policies.

While Africa is struggling with the logic of a first come, first served, or that of a winner-take- all, the dawn of the twenty-first century has introduced yet another challenge for Africa: the global village. The reality of the global village requires that cultures co-exist peacefully if they are to benefit from access to the world market. How can Africans live in a global village without making their cultural differences a political weapon to eliminate those who have been targeted as political opponents?  How can Africans transform their usage of culture from being a source of conflict to a resource of peace?

There exist many ways to respond to these new challenges to Africa. One can be education through training programs, which can create opportunity for local communities to gather and learn from each other.  Is this utopian, or an idealistic vision of a solution to Africa’s problems?  How can this vision be practical, possible and effective? What should be done?  The Context
Africa is growing and changing every day. Those who have spent any length of time in Africa have seen the population growth- mainly in the capital cities. This growing and changing environment is contrasted by the lack of growth and change in the social, political and economic sectors. As the population is increasing in numbers all over Africa, some countries are facing serious problems in maintaining the growth and movement of their populations. Others lack even a viable infrastructure to contain their populations within their borders and create more life opportunities. As populations grow, so too grows a sense of dissatisfaction, humiliation and shame among many Africans- especially the young.
As in other places, the end of the Cold War (1989) has increased the number of challenges any government has to face. The nature and sources of conflict, for example, have dramatically changed and reveal a need for serious inquiry. The presence of new, often non-state actors (warlords), and the increasing numbers of cross-border wars are among many of the new phenomena Africa is facing (Rwanda, Burundi, DRC, Sudan, Tchad, DRC, Congo-Brazzaville, Uganda, Somali, Kenya). Armed conflict and the number of internally and externally displaced people have also created a new phenomenon in conflict study in the continent. Refugees populations are no longer composed solely of civilians only but now are often mingled with armed groups, the former army and even members of the overthrown government- as was seen in the aftermath of the ‘94 Rwandan Genocide.
Once in refugee camps or in exile, those groups (known as negative forces) can take advantage of the proximity of the refugee camps to their former countries, reorganizing themselves and launching attacks which create regional insecurity and destabilization as demonstrated in recent case of South Sudan- North of DR Congo (January2017). Like during the apartheid regime in South Africa, the regime conducted incursion in neighboring countries such as Lesotho, Botswana and Swaziland to track down black south Africans refugees. The same happened when in 1996 regimes in the Great Lakes Region of Africa including Rwanda-Burundi-Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo fought each other or accused one another of harboring refugees, the same thing happened in West and Southern Africa including Liberia-Sierra Leone, Liberia-Sierra Leone- Guinea (Conakry), Namibia- Botswana, Zambia-Angola, Namibia-Angola, Sudan-Uganda etc…
Most of these inter-state conflicts began with the presence of people displaced from their homelands, who attempt to return by use of force as a rebel movement. In other cases, conflict erupts as former refugees return, demanding to regain their land and belongings.
The other phenomenon observed is that of national identity- as is the case in Congo-DRC (the Banyamulenge issue), and in Cote d’Ivoire (with A. Ouattara). This phenomenon, identified as Identity Conflict, has its origins in the non-recognition of cultural differences among many. This inability and unwillingness to transcend cultural differences is generated by the myth of origins and the lack of structural land reform policies.
While Africa is struggling with the logic of a first come, first served, or that of a winner-take- all, the dawn of the twenty-first century has introduced yet another challenge for Africa: the global village. The reality of the global village requires that cultures co-exist peacefully if they are to benefit from access to the world market. How can Africans live in a global village without making their cultural differences a political weapon to eliminate those who have been targeted as political opponents? How can Africans transform their usage of culture from being a source of conflict to a resource of peace?
There exist many ways to respond to these new challenges to Africa. One can be education through training programs, which can create opportunity for local communities to gather and learn from each other. Is this utopian, or an idealistic vision of a solution to Africa’s problems? How can this vision be practical, possible and effective? What should be done? Who should do it? Where and in what manner? All these questions will be elicited in this training manual.

Who should do it? Where and in what manner? All these questions should be elicited by those involved in Peacebuilding.

{ 0 comments }

Religions, Social conflict, and Peace: Beyond the “religious actor” model: Structural activism for peace

April 10, 2017

in Rwanda, Burundi, DR Congo and Uganda, nationality, gender, sexism, power differentials, colonialism, structural and systemic violence, inequalities, class, militarization, organize crime and plundering of national resources created the opportunity for regional conflict transformation program using Intersectionality-informed approach.
Being part of the solution after being part of the Problem.
The key role played by the Church of Rwanda in orchestrating the killings of the innocent Tutsi and Hutus required that the Church of Rwanda be part of long term solution. The regional African Churches and their partners were called upon to walk alongside the Churches of Rwanda regardless of their actions.

Read the full article →

Ubuntu: La Culture de la Paix en Afrique Une Perspective Afro-Chretienne (Perspective Africaine de la Reconciliation t. 1) (French Edition) Kindle Edition by Fidele Ayu Lumeya (Author)

March 18, 2017

Avant l’avènement des églises, des mosquées, de la Bible ou du Coran, les Africains recourraient aux valeurs traditionnelles transmises par leurs ancêtres pour faire face aux conflits. Ces valeurs se trouvaient enracinées dans les notions de solidarité, de développement et de préservation des communautés. Quand la Bible et le Coran ont été introduits en Afrique, les valeurs et l’éthique contenues dans ces écrits religieux ont paru compatibles à la pensée traditionnelle et les Africains les ont adoptées pour compléter les compétences indigènes en matière de transformation des conflits.
Comme plusieurs Africanistes, Fidèle Lumeya est convaincu que la Religion Africaine ne s’écarte pas du tout de la logique Judéo-Chrétienne; mais au contraire, elle est comme une telescope au travers de laquelle les Africaines et Africains interprètent Dieu et le monde, un Dieu present- absent. Présent car son omni-présence se fait sentir dans le vécu quotidien de l’Africaine et de l’Africain. Absent car on peut ni le voir ni ne le touché. En ce qui concerne les conflits et la reconstruction de la Paix, la Religion Africaine est en symbiose avec les trois religions Abrahamiques à savoir: le Judaism, l’Islam et le Christianisme. Ce livre explore l’Éthique de la Reconstruction de la Paix selon la Religion Africaine mais dans une perspective Afro-Chrétienne.

Read the full article →

Mediating Ethno Nationalist and Political Conflict in a Multiethnic Society: The Democratic Republic of the Congo

January 23, 2017

In this book, Lumeya highlights the issues of social and group identity, and focuses on the abhorrent mobilization of child soldiers.  He also comments on peace efforts that have achieved success, and presents alternatives to violence.  He advocates for “the creation of a space where reconciliation and healing process can start; where truth can be told and mercy granted.”

Read the full article →

Peacebuilding and Sustainable Development in the African Great Lakes Region a region Too big to fail and too poorly managed to Develop

June 26, 2015

This article explores conflict sensitive economic development from the perspectives of people living in the African Great Lakes Region represented here by Muzaliwa, a 70 years old man who worked as a night guard for the volunteer couple sent by the Mennonite Central Committee, in Bukavu/Eastern Congo,(1995-99). The couple were assigned to strengthen the Peacebuilding and development work of the Council of Churches of Congo, the Civil Society and, religious leaders from Rwanda and Burundi who fled the ’94 genocide in Rwanda

Read the full article →

Killing in the name of God and Government: The Paradox of Living in the Great Lakes Region.

January 21, 2015

God is everywhere present in the Great Lakes Region of Africa in the countries of Burundi, DR Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. Life for political elites and ordinary citizens revolves around places of worship. God’s presence envelops and embodies both time and space. Long before the arrival of Christian and Islamic missionaries, God was manifest in this region, expressed in a variety of symbols and mediums, including artistic and musical forms. No one in power, in eons past or now, has ignored God’s presence. Rulers may have rebelled at certain points, but were obliged, eventually, to recognize God’s sovereignty. God’s presence has been, is now, and will in future be felt in this region.
How does a realization of this presence influence the politics and policies of those serving in government? The answer must be lodged within and must be integral to the accepted concepts of governance.

Read the full article →

Prevention, Detection and Protection a Pronk approach to the Defense of Press Freedom

August 24, 2014

by: Fidele Ayu Lumeya There is no reason journalists should be arrested, jailed and even killed other than a legislative reform in many countries that takes into account the key role journalists plays in human activities of daily lives for Journalist are light bearers, salt and Sheep. I will discuss the three metaphors explain how […]

Read the full article →

Systemic, Structural Violence in the Great Lakes Region and the Disintegration of an Ownership Society

October 16, 2013

By: Fidele Lumeya Regime changes in Burundi, Congo Democratic, Uganda and Rwanda have affected not only the disintegration and collapse of the ownership society that had existed, but facilitated the collapse of religious and traditional authority that had played key moral, spiritual and ethical roles and had replaced them with unrealistic policies and processes with […]

Read the full article →

Military and Humanitarian Mission Creep: Lessons Learned From the Failed States of Burundi, Congo-DR and Rwanda (The Great Lakes Region of Africa)

February 9, 2013

Burundi, the DR Congo and Rwanda are three contiguous countries in
the Great Lakes Region of Africa still struggling with: the effects of
the demise of the Cold War; with the demise of France-Afrique; with
the shift from single to multiparty rule; and last, but not least,
with the collapse of traditional and religious authority. All of the
above-noted dynamics were perceived within the matrix of ‘means vs.
ends’ by those who previously ruled the three countries, namely,
Pierre Buyoya of Burundi, J. Mobutu of the DR Congo and J. Habyarimana
of Rwanda

Read the full article →

Africa: The continent must look beyond its colonial past for the causes of current conflicts.

October 24, 2012

By Fidele A. Lumeya  More than three decades after African countries gained their independence; there is a growing recognition among Africans themselves that the continent must look beyond its colonial past for the causes of current conflicts. Today more than ever, Africa must look at itself. The nature of the political power in many African […]

Read the full article →

Smoke from the Sky Roof: The 9/11

September 11, 2012

  By: Fidele A. Lumeya Look it is coming Smoke, Smoke It’s overflowing Overwhelming Thinking about Who set the fire. Earth wake up and explain to us. Honey it is nine eleven A dark day Day of national tragedy No melody From inside the flights Crossing blue skies A sunny day Carrying victims And smiling suicides […]

Read the full article →

Rwanda- Congo: In Search for A JustPeace Society

July 3, 2012

Rwanda cannot prevent a second genocide to happen in Rwanda at the expense of the Eastern Congolese people lives and their search for peaceful inter-ethnic cohabitation. And, DR Congo on the other side of the Lake Kivu, cannot prevent the so called “Balkanization” of the Congo by ignoring or down playing the real intention and agenda of the Hutu extremist living in Congo. The Hutu extremist as well as too cannot regain power in Rwanda at the expense of the Eastern Congolese people lives and the Rwandans. The so called “Hutu power” cannot ignore that any majority cannot govern by ignoring the minority and vice versa.

Read the full article →

the International Criminal Court And the Challenge of Peace and Justice in The Great North- Eastern Congo

April 19, 2012

Once again the President of DRCongo Kabila is being challenged in his role of commander in chief of the Congolese Army and as the chief of executive. In both he has to make a quick a well thought decision before the population of the North and South Kivu can start fleeing in the bushes again. […]

Read the full article →

The DR Congo: Post-Election Crisis: Bridging the gap between Democracy as A Process and as A System.

March 15, 2012

Congolese people acknowledge, generally, that the intended function of
the democratic process in the Congo, and elsewhere, is to maintain the
balance of power between the executive, the legislative and the judicial branches of government. For such a democracy to work, the
executive branch must be engaged in a transformational relationship with
both the legislature and the judiciary and not a transactional. In the case of the Congo, the skewed relationship (transactional) between the executive and the judiciary appears to have had harmful effects on the nation state building process.

Read the full article →

President Joseph Kabila: His Second Term and Three Challenges awaiting

February 17, 2012

For many Congolese, the two-week presidential campaign did not provide time sufficient to vet the eleven presidential candidates nor time to understand their respective programs and the underlying values. Much like the dynamics of a beauty contest, candidates were on display and the electoral commission, CENI, served as the judges.

Read the full article →

A Devaluation of Congolese Politics by Rev. Pasteur Daniel Ngoy Mulunda and the loss of “Democratic Gains” in DR Congo.

January 7, 2012

For the greater good of the Congolese nation the Rev. Daniel Ngoy Mulunda, president of the Congolese Electoral Commission, should present himself to the coming Congolese parliament, offering an apology to the elected representatives of the 70 million Congolese

Read the full article →

Democratic Rep. of Congo: Can the post-electoral rage out of the Country Lead to a Congolese Version of an Arab Spring Revolution

December 28, 2011

By Fidele A. Lumeya Mobilizing the social media such as Facebook as the member of opposition living in Diaspora (many of them are member of the ethnically based political party known as the Union for Democracy and Social Progress, UDPS), has done or are doing to call for a spontaneous expression of rage outside the […]

Read the full article →

The Democratic Republic of Congo: The 2011 elections and its paradoxes

November 29, 2011

From Okapi Radio BY: Fidele A. Lumeya 1. The majority of voters are women. 2. The majority of voters live in rural areas of the DRC. 3. Thirty two million Congolese have been registered to vote, the majority of whom are illiterate. 4. The eleven presidential candidates are men. 5. Only a minority of the […]

Read the full article →

Humanitarian Assistance in DR Congo: Relief aid and Rape of Women

May 25, 2011

By: Fidele Ayu Lumeya Flumeya@gmail.com People in the West of the Congo are left with the impression that ‘Relief and development aid comes as a reward to those in Eastern Congo who took guns to kill and rape each other rather than to those from West who refrained from such behavior?’ Relief aid in the […]

Read the full article →

Intersectionality Peacebuilding and Trauma Studies

August 31, 2017

Intersectional Peacebuilding and Trauma Studies in Kinshasa in 2019 The Center seeks to partner with other Peacebuilding Institute or Center interested in research, teach and collaborate on the intertwined roles of intersectionality, Peacebuilding and Trauma in sustaining long lasting peaceful communities. We now know more about communities are conflict-ridden but less how communities are long […]

Read the full article →

Intersectionality Peacebuilding and Trauma Studies

August 31, 2017

Intersectional Peacebuilding and Trauma Studies at Congo Ubuntu Peacebuilding Center in Kinshasa-Mbama/IPN/ DR Congo/2019 The Center seeks to partner with other Peacebuilding Institute or Center interested in research, teach and collaborate on the intertwined roles of intersectionality, Peacebuilding and Trauma in sustaining long lasting peaceful communities. We now know more about communities are conflict-ridden but […]

Read the full article →

Peacebuilding and Sustainable Development in the African Great Lakes Region a region Too big to fail and too poorly managed to Develop.

June 23, 2015

The countries of Burundi, Congo-DR, Rwanda and Uganda in the Great Lakes region of Africa have created, attracted, and now interact with a multitude of organizational structures and actors. In addition to local and national governance structures, governments of the respective Great Lakes countries have initiated regional agencies to facilitate trade and other matters of […]

Read the full article →